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Newspaper Archive of
The Julian News
Julian , California
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February 24, 2021     The Julian News
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February 24, 2021
 

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www.JulianNews.com M A I L E D F R O M JULIAN C A . 9 2 0 3 6 PRESORTED STandARD U.S. POSTAGE PAID PERMIT NO. 30 JULIAN, CA Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036 Change Service requested DATED MATERIAL The Newspaper of Record. For the Community, by the Community. ESTABLISHED 1985 An Independent Weekly Newspaper Serving the Backcountry Communities of Julian, Cuyamaca, Santa Ysabel, Shelter Valley, Mt. Laguna, Ranchita, Canebreak, Sunshine Summit, Warner Springs and Wynola. ISSN 1937-8416 Wednesday February 24, 2021 Julian, CA. Julian, CA. Volume 36 — Issue 30 continued on page 1 $ 1.00 (92¢ + tax included) Back Country Covid-19 Positive Tests as of February 20* (weeks new positives) Julian = 99 (+7) ** Ramona = 2,287 (+19) ** Mt. Laguna = 2 Ranchita = 13 (+3) ** Warner Springs = 53 ** Santa Ysabel = 57 ** Borrego Springs = 125 (+6) ** Descanso = 72 (+0) ** Alpine = 1,025 (+25) ** Poway = 2,164 (+26) Lakeside = 1530 (+46) ** Total Confirmed cases in Unincorporated San Diego County = 34,882 a total rise of 2,076. ** The County has again furnished the information for all zip codes and we are able to track cases throughout the back country. If you believe you have symptoms please get tested. Most testing locations do not require an appointment. To find information on a testing location near you or call 2-1- 1 (toll free) or on the web 211sandiego.org. State Statistics The 7-day positivity rate Statewide is 3.1% and the 14- day positivity rate is 3.5%. As of February 21, providers have reported administering a total of 7,320,679 vaccine doses statewide. Numbers do not represent true day-to-day change as reporting may be delayed. The CDC reports that 8,832,770 doses have been delivered to entities within the state, and 9,264,515 vaccine doses, which includes the first and second dose, have been shipped. 52 counties in the Purple (widespread) Tier 3 counties in the Red (substantial) Tier – Del Norte, Mariposa, and Plumas 3 counties in Orange (moderate) Tier – Alpine, Sierra, and Trinity Vaccinate All 58 In order to increase the pace of COVID-19 vaccine distribution to those at greatest risk, the state is prioritizing individuals 65 and older to receive the vaccine as demand subsides among health care workers. This effort will help to reduce hospitalizations and safe lives. To sign up for a notification when you’re eligible for a vaccine, please visit myturn.ca.gov. For more information on the vaccine effort, visit the Vaccinate All 58 webpage. County Statistics San Diego County’s state- calculated, adjusted case rate is currently 22.2 cases per 100,000 residents and the region is in Purple Tier or Tier 1. The testing positivity percentage is 6.4%, placing the County in Tier 2 or the Red Tier. While the testing positivity rate for the County qualifies it for the Red Tier, the state uses the most restrictive metric – in this case the adjusted case rate – and assigns counties to that tier. Therefore, the County remains in the Purple Tier or Tier 1. The County’s health equity metric, which looks at the testing positivity for areas with the lowest healthy conditions, is 9.7% and it’s in the Purple Tier or Tier 1. This metric does not move counties to more restrictive tiers but is required to advance to a less restrictive tier. continued on page 8 Resources for local businesses (COVID-19) Resources for local businesses (COVID-19) https://visitjulian.com/member-covid-19-resources https://visitjulian.com/member-covid-19-resources (no membership required) (no membership required) E S T A B L I S H E D 1 8 7 0 Y E A R S Y E A R S High School Sports Could Have Limited Return Black History The Jim Crow Legacy from the History Channel Jim Crow laws were a collection of state and local statutes that legalized racial segregation. Named after a Black minstrel show character, the laws—which existed for about 100 years, from the post-Civil War era until 1968—were meant to marginalize African Americans by denying them the right to vote, hold jobs, get an education or other opportunities. Those who attempted to defy Jim Crow laws often faced arrest, fines, jail sentences, violence and death. Black Codes The roots of Jim Crow laws began as early as 1865, immediately following the ratification of the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery in the United States. Black codes were strict local and state laws that detailed when, where and how formerly enslaved people could work, and for how much compensation. The codes appeared throughout the South as a legal way to put Black citizens into indentured servitude, to take voting rights away, to control where they lived and how they traveled and to seize children for labor purposes. The legal system was stacked against Black citizens, with former Confederate soldiers working as police and judges, making it difficult for African Americans to win court cases and ensuring they were subject to Black codes. These codes worked in conjunction with labor camps for the incarcerated, where prisoners were treated as enslaved people. Black offenders typically received longer sentences than their white equals, and because of the grueling work, often did not live out their entire sentence. Ku Klux Klan During the Reconstruction era, local governments, as well as the national Democratic Party and President Andrew Johnson, thwarted efforts to help Black Americans move forward. Violence was on the rise, making danger a regular aspect of African American life. Black schools were vandalized and destroyed, and bands of violent white people attacked, tortured and lynched Black citizens in the night. Families were attacked and forced off their land all across the South. The most ruthless organization of the Jim Crow era, the Ku Klux Klan, was born in 1865 in Pulaski, Tennessee, as a private club for Confederate veterans. The KKK grew into a secret society terrorizing Black communities and seeping through white Southern culture, with members at the highest levels of government and in the lowest echelons of criminal back alleys. Jim Crow Laws Expand At the start of the 1880s, big cities in the South were not wholly beholden to Jim Crow laws and Black Americans found more freedom in them. This led to substantial Black populations moving to the cities and, as the decade progressed, white city dwellers demanded more laws to limit opportunities for African Americans. Jim Crow laws soon spread around the country with even more force than previously. Public parks were forbidden for African Americans to enter, and theaters and restaurants were segregated. Segregated waiting rooms in bus and train stations were required, as well as water fountains, restrooms, building entrances, elevators, cemeteries, even amusement-park cashier windows. Laws forbade African Americans from living in white neighborhoods. Segregation was enforced for public pools, phone booths, hospitals, asylums, jails and residential homes for the elderly and handicapped. Some states required separate textbooks for Black and white students. New Orleans mandated the segregation of prostitutes according to race. In Atlanta, African Americans in court were given a different Bible from white people to swear on. Marriage and cohabitation between white and Black people was strictly forbidden in most Southern states. It was not uncommon to see signs posted at town and city limits warning African Americans that they were not welcome there. Ida B. Wells As oppressive as the Jim Crow era was, it was also a time when many African Americans around the country stepped forward into leadership roles to vigorously oppose the laws. Memphis teacher Ida B. Wells became a prominent activist against Jim Crow laws after refusing to leave a first-class train car designated for white people only. A conductor forcibly removed her and she successfully sued the railroad, though that decision was later reversed by a higher court. Angry at the injustice, Wells devoted herself to fighting Jim Crow laws. Her vehicle for dissent was newspaper writing: In 1889 she became co-owner of the Memphis Free Speech and Headlight and used her position to take on school segregation and sexual harassment. Wells traveled throughout the South to publicize her work and advocated for the arming of Black citizens. Wells also investigated lynchings and wrote about her findings. A mob destroyed her newspaper and threatened her with death, forcing her to move to the North, where she continued her efforts against Jim Crow laws and lynching. Charlotte Hawkins Brown Charlotte Hawkins Brown was a North Carolina-born, Massachusetts-raised Black woman who returned to her birthplace at the age of 17, in 1901, to work as a teacher for the American Missionary Association. After funding was withdrawn for that school, Brown began fundraising to start her own school, named the Palmer Memorial Institute. Brown became the first Black woman to create a Black school in North Carolina and through her education work became a fierce and vocal opponent of Jim Crow laws. Isaiah Montgomery Not everyone battled for equal rights within white society—some chose a separatist approach. Convinced by Jim Crow laws that Black and white people could not live peaceably together, formerly enslaved Isaiah Montgomery created the African American-only town of Mound Bayou, Mississippi, continued on page 3