"
Newspaper Archive of
The Julian News
Julian , California
Lyft
February 24, 2021     The Julian News
PAGE 11     (11 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 11     (11 of 12 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
February 24, 2021
 

Newspaper Archive of The Julian News produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




The Julian News 11 February 24, 2021 Chef’s Corner continued from page 6 WORSHIP SERVICES PERSONAL SUPPORT Teen Teen Crisis Crisis HotLine HotLine 1-800- HIT HOME 1-800- HIT HOME SUBSTANCE ABUSE CRISIS LINE 1•888•724•7240 1•888•724•7240 MEETINGS continued from page 7 CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING - Notice to Advertisers: Any error should be reported to the Julian News prior to Thursday at 12 Noon following the publication date. The Julian News accepts advertising on the condition that advertiser agrees that at no time shall The Julian News Liability exceed the cost of space involved and that the Julian News is not liable for incidental or consequential damages. The Julian News accepts no responsibility for ad contents or errors in spelling or grammar. Placing a Classified Advertisement: To order a classified ad by mail, please send your advertisement with a check or Money Order to Julian News PO Box 639 Julian, CA 92036. Phone Orders are accepted Wednesday, Thursday 9 am to 5 pm, Friday 9 am to 12 noon. Visa and Master Card are accepted. Ads must be paid for at time of placement and will appear in the next issue. NO refunds for Classified Ads. Office phone - 760 765 2231. BACKCOUNTRY CLASSIFIEDS $30 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD $30 FOR 4 ISSUES, 25 WORDS OR LESS; 25¢ EXTRA PER WORD Trivia Time continued from page 6 ® 2020 King Features Syndicate, Inc. Need help? Call 800.656.HOPE (4673) to be connected with a trained staff member from a sexual assault service provider in your area. EMPLOYMENT OFFERED In accordance with Federal law and U.S. Department of Labor Policy, The Julian News will not publish, any advertisement for employment that discriminates on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or disability. The Julian News encourages equal opportunity employment in the work place. Worship and Sunday School at 8:30 and 10:00 Blending of traditional and contemporary elements Warm welcome and uplifting music Relevant, thoughtful message Location: 2898 State Hwy 78 (just west of Pine Hills Road, look for the white rail fence) Phone: 760-765-0114 E-mail: communityumcjulian@yahoo.com Community United Methodist Church Celebrating 50 years of loving God and serving our neighbors No Services This Sunday 1. Cliff Avril. 2. The Colorado Rockies. 3. A modified Wilson 6-iron. 4. Sonny Liston. 5. Double Gloucester. 6. An egg thrown from the upper deck. 7. Don Budge. Answers 1. Tooth enamel 2. California’s 3. Woodrow Wilson, March 1913 4. About 23,000 5. “Batman Forever” (1995) 6. Oklahoma (Oklahoma City) 7. Stone mason 8. Q 9. A tower 10. “Fahrenheit 451,” Ray Bradbury * * * Angela Shelf Medearis is an award- winning children’s author, culinary historian and the author of seven cookbooks. Her new cookbook is “The Kitchen Diva’s Diabetic Cookbook.” To see how-to videos, recipes and much, much more, Like Angela Shelf Medearis, The Kitchen Diva! on Facebook. © 2021 King Features Synd., Inc., and Angela Shelf Medearis Sara Petite continued from page 4 WYNOLA PIZZA is interviewing for part time janitorial and miscellaneous maintenance and repairs. Call Sabine @ 760.550.3737 2/24 JULIAN HOTEL - Housekeeping position available. Looking for applicants who are friendly, dependable & have attention to detail. Great working environment. Call 760-315-3179 for details & to apply. 3/17 Casserole of Rice and Meat, to be steamed for 45 minutes and served with tomato sauce. “In the 20th century, casseroles took on a distinctive American identity. During the depression of the 1890s, the economic casserole provided a welcome way to stretch meat, fish and poultry. Certain items also were scarce during World War I, and leftovers were turned into casserole meals. The same was true during the Great Depression of the 1930s.” The casseroles we know today became popular in the 1930s during the Great Depression. Typically, casseroles are composed of a meat, starch, creamy sauce (after 1934, it was usually a creamed soup from a can) and a vegetable. Casseroles are an economical, one-pot meal, and can be prepared in advance for breakfast, lunch or dinner. During the 1950s-’70s, casseroles became an easy way for a busy cook, and a modern workforce composed of women, to prepare the family meal ahead of time. Today, casseroles have been updated to include a variety of ingredients from lobster and tofu to made-from-scratch sauces and locally grown vegetables. The shape, size and construction materials of casserole dishes have also changed over its centuries-old history. However, the purpose of the casserole is still the same, to bring a familiar container of comfort food to the ones we love. Bring a little comfort to your family and friends with this Sausage and Gumbo Casserole With Garlic Toast Topping, and enjoy a little history with each bite! SAUSAGE AND GUMBO CASSEROLE WITH GARLIC TOAST TOPPING 1 pound smoked sausage, cut into 1/4-inch-thick slices 3 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 medium-size green bell pepper, chopped 1 small onion, chopped 1/4 cup instant roux mix, like Tony Chachere’s Creole Instant Roux Mix 1 (10-ounce) can diced tomatoes and green chiles, like Rotel’s 1 (32-ounce) container chicken broth 1 (16-ounce) package frozen okra 1 cup quick-cooking rice, uncooked 1/2 teaspoon Cajun seasoning 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 3 tablespoons butter, melted 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 (12-ounce) French baguette, cut into 1/2-inch-thick slices Fresh parsley, finely chopped for garnish 1. Heat the oil in a Dutch oven over high heat, 1-2 minutes. Add the sausage, green bell pepper and onion. Saute the sausage mixture for 8 minutes or until browned; stir in roux mix. Cook, stirring constantly, 2 minutes. 2. Stir in tomatoes, chicken broth, okra, rice, Cajun seasoning and thyme. Bring mixture to a boil. Remove from heat. Pour into a 13- by 9-inch baking dish. 3. Stir together butter and garlic; brush on one side of bread slices. Top sausage mixture evenly with bread slices, buttered side up. 4. Bake, covered, at 425 F for 10 minutes. Then, uncover casserole dish and bake 10 minutes. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. Sprinkle with parsley, if desired. Makes 8 to 10 servings. African and American Folktales __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ U I F U B M L J O H F H H T __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ : Bzzz A West African Tale: by Verna Aardema John Henry: An American Legend by Ezra Jack Keats H A M M E R by Robert San Souci W + ’ Many parents tell folktales to their children. Storytellers spin folktales for groups of listeners. In a folktale there may be: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 P R O B L E M S E X P L A N A T I O N S U N I S H M N T L E S S N S H E R O S R E W R D M A G C A L T A L K I G Did you find out the names of the three folktales? 3. 1. 4. It is said that he had this in his hand when he was born: T H E T A L K I N G E G G S W H Y M O S Q U I T O E S B U Z Z I N P E O P L E S E A R S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 C R O C O D I L E W A R T H O G M N K E Y T R T O I E L O N C H E T H S N K E S P I D E R J A C K A L H A M E L E N Annimill s LLC © 2021 B L A C K 2. In the tale, Beautiful Blackbird: by Ashley Bryan, a bird paints a touch of his beautiful color onto other birds’ feathers. __ __ __ __ __ release party. Friends in Europe and different parts of the US can watch it. I get so excited to see people. This show will be different, but when I’ve done previous online shows, I can see who comes online, and it’s hard not to stop and say hi! I’m like a puppy when I see people I know. I really love a lot of people, and it’s so exciting and humbling the friends I’ve met through music. The video for your new single “The Misfits” is a lot of fun. How did that unfold? Did you go in with a concept, or was it improvised? “The Misfits” is about speaking your truth when it may not always be popular; it’s also about love. David Bianco, who produced the song before he passed, had said to me after I showed it to him, “Wow, I can really see who you are and your soul in this song.” It was so lovely that he saw me. Love is really the cure all. But it’s not some airy-fairy thing. Real love is judicious; love is patient, kind, and hard work. Real loyalty that doesn’t blur boundaries is a big deal. This came from an experience I had hanging out with some artists. We don’t always fit in, but I think artists, painters, great orators, people who stick their neck out and speak their truth, make this world more colorful and great. The video was supposed to be a parade of the misfits. Under COVID restrictions, we had to improvise. And somehow, I ended up looking like Little Stevie with a scarf on my head for part of it while I was rocking out. The ‘80s look with the tapes came from the guys who helped direct it. It just fit. We filmed most of it on a green screen. \They did a wonderful job, And so did my small cast of characters. I understand you were raised in a Tulip farming town in Washington but now live in San Diego. Do you feel like your small-town roots are part of who you are as a musician? Or do you feel more inspired by your big city surroundings? We were taught to work hard at a very young age and were raised with a lot of tough love. We grew up in the forest. I loved it. I miss it so much. It’s not really there anymore. My mother would kick us out until dinner, and we’d hang out in trees and the forest floor. It was so amazing. I can’t believe how I got to grow up. My parents did well for themselves but worked really hard from nothing to get there. They instilled an amazing work ethic in all of us. It wasn’t a perfect family. Sometimes it was very hard. But there was a lot of love in my family. And I had the fortune to grow up with a twin sister besides my older siblings, and it was one of the most amazing experiences of my life. Our town was small; my mother really pushed us to get out of it and go see the world. If you stay in one place your whole life, it’s hard to understand people from different places. I am happy I got out, but I love going home. Tell us what’s coming up for Sara Petite in the new year as far as promoting your new album and other events and releases. I can’t wait to keep playing, writing,andgetbacktoliveshows. I’m really itching to do live shows. But I think right now, we all have to adapt and see opportunity and possibility in a world that seems like it’s restricted. It’s just begging us to be more creative and think outside the box. AA Meetings www.NCsandiegoAA.org 760-758-2514 Monday - 11am Shelter Valley Community Center (Information: 760 765 3261 0R 760 765 0527) Tuesday - 9am Sisters In Recovery (open to all females - 12 step members) information: 760-765-2331 Tuesday - 7pm Santa Ysabel Mission Church (Open Big Book Study) Wednesday - 6pm Warner Community Resourse Center (Across street from Warner Unified School) Thursday - 7pm BYOB - Bring Yer Own Book Closed meeting; book study St. Elizabeth Church (Downstairs) Thursday - 7pm Shelter Valley Community Center Shelter Doodle Group AA Open Meeting Friday - 5pm Ramona Sobriety Party Spirit of Joy Church - 1735 Main St Saturday - 5pm Ramona Free Thinkers AA Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road Sunday - 5:30pm Sweet Surender Speaker Meeting Ramona Recovery Club 1710 Montecito Road * * * One of the points in which I was especially interested was the Jim Crow regulations, that is, the system of separation of the races in street cars and railroad trains. — Ray Stannard Baker * * * * * * The injustices endured by black Americans at the hands of their own government have no parallel in our history, not only during the period of slavery but also in the Jim Crow era that followed. — Jim Webb * * * * * * We have defeated Jim Crow, but now we have to deal with his son, James Crow Jr., esquire. — Al Sharpton * * *