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August 3, 2011     The Julian News
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August 3, 2011 PUBLIC NOTICE US Army Corps Request for information about the former of Engineers® Borrego Springs- Benson/Ocotillo Dry Lake Recently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a Site Inspection at the former Borrego Springs. Benson/Ocotillo Dry Lake. This site was used as an emergency landing field for horizontal, glide and dive bombing (using practice bombs) from 1942 through 1947. The former Borrego Springs. Benson/Ocotillo Dry Lake is one of many former military installations throughout the United States that will be reviewed under the Department of Defense's Munitions Response Site Prioritization Protocol. This protocol is used to assess sites that may have unexploded ordnance, discarded military munitions or munitions constituents, and to assign priorities for any additional investigation or munitions removal that may be required. The evaluation criteria, including types of munitions that may be present, ease of access to the site, and number of people living near the site are available for public review in the Site Inspection Report. A copy of the document is located at the Borrego Springs Branch Library, 587 Palm Canyon Drive Suite 125, Borrego Springs, CA 92004. The draft final version of this document is also available on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Website at http:// www.spl.usace.army.mil/fuds.html. For more information or if you have additional information about past activities related to the former Borrego Springs. Benson/Ocotillo Dry Lake, please contact: For media queries: Jennie Ayala Public Affairs Specialist 452-3925 or (213) 479-8634 Lloyd Godard Project Manager (213) 452-4014 or (213) USACE, Los Angeles District USACE, Los Angeles District ATTN: CESPL-PM-M ATTN: CESPL-PA 915 Wilshire Blvd. 915 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1146 Los Angeles, CA 90017-3401 Los Angeles, CA 90017 lloyd .e.godard@usace.army.mil jennie.ayala@usace.army.mil , ,u,,s,.o%,:.;:.7u.,3.2o11 05664 An Eagle Of An Idea My Bother Val's Adventure My legs hang out of the open airplane. Wind blasts my face• The jump mistress shouts -"JUMP!" I lean into the wind and grab the struts• My heart's in my mouth- My God- what am I doing here? About a month ago we were sitting at the Eagles Lodge Bar. Already one beer over capacity, I said to my buddies, "Why don't we go skydiving?" Buster and Randy thought it a superb idea, so we drank another beer to the great adventure• It sounded better every time we met to hoist a few. Busters' niece, Michelle, joined in the plan, along with a couple of Randy's friends. The arrangements to do the deed went forward without a hitch• This morning I awoke at four thirty, shoved the dog out of bed, dressed, and read the paper over my morning coffee• It was still early when I packed some salami and cheese for lunch. There'll be no beer today until after the jump. I want to be as sober as a Mormon for this event. I stick another pack of Camels in my pocket. That'll last until two- thirty jump time. The Club had stressed the five-hour ground school starts promptly at nine- thirty• At seven-thirty I hear gravel crunching in the driveway as Michelle drives up. I climb into the back seat beside Buster, and we're on the way• Six cigarettes later we arrive in Estracada. Randy and his co-workers, Tina and Mike, are already there• We survey the layout• The Estracada Skydiving Club is not a sight to inspire confidence• It looks like a run down old farm. Two shabby barn red buildings sit in the corner of a large, hot, field of closely mowed weeds• A ragged yellow windsock hangs limply on the pole• A half dozen derelict planes sit scattered in a state of disrepair• Two have engines missing and a large shadow of unmowed grass• At the end of the dirt runway a couple of planes look somewhat better; both possessing engines and no grass shadow. Those must be the jump planes• We enter the office where a noisy blue parrot presides over an incredibly messy room. All flat surfaces are covered with half-eaten snacks, newspapers and assorted rubbish. My nose says there must be a grill around• The smell of stale grease almost makes my stomach do an early sky dive• Ralph swaggers in from a back room. His belly hangs well over his belt. "There'll be a short delay," he says without explanation• We register, signing scads of waivers releasing them of all responsibility for our crazy idea. "You have two options," Ralph says. "Youcan make a tandem jump from about 10,000 feet or a solo jump from 4000 feet with a static line. It costs the same either way." Michelle opts for the tandem jump, thinking it wiser to have someone else make the decision to jump. We macho guys decide to do the static line jump. We hunt some shade, smoke and shoot the bull• Periodically Ralph emerges to take a load of jumpers up. The sun is hot, there's no beer, my cigarettes are going fast, and the bull is terminally ill. An hour late, we assemble in a classroom at the back of the ancient barn• We thread our way past heaps of moldy parachutes stacked along one wall and an assortment of greasy aircraft parts piled on the other side. A jumper is packing his chute on the dirty floor. We settle down for the words of wisdom we'll need to survive this day. There are frequent breaks for Ralph to take jumpers up• It's going to be a long day and I should have packed more lunch and more cigarettes• Michelle finishes her abbreviated version of ground school and goes up for her tandem jump• We cheer as they come falling out of the sky. Their landing is perfect and she's as happy as a sailor in Singapore• Our enthusiasm is re-ignited by her success• Our jumping and landing techniques are practiced with varying degrees of success• After another break for Ralph we go to the Rigging Room, predictably littered with assorted aviation junk• My energy and enthusiasm are running out as fast as my cigarettes. It's four PM and the wind has come up. Ralph checks the wind speed and tells us to hang loose for a while• "We've already been hanging loose too damn long," I mumble• At five he checks again and says, "It's still blowing too hard, but should die down in a half- hour. When the wind calms down, we'll go over the checklist and be ready to go." He repeats the above message three more times and I'm getting as edgy as a hound dog in heat• The chutes are finally strapped on and we pose for pictures, videos and the signing of our last Wills and Testaments• We troop out to the plane and pack ourselves into the grease soaked fuselage• There are five jumpers• Ralph is the pilot; his wife is jump mistress• The order of jumping is assigned according to weight• rm number three• We taxi to the end of the runway continued on page 12 Tattered Tidbits No. 4 by Albert Simonson (Santa Ysabel, April 1826) Lieutenant Juan Ibarra and his detachment rode into the mountains to engage rampaging Indians who threatened the prosperous mission farms, cattle, chapel, and granaries at Santa Ysabel• • He lost three men, but killed 28 of the enemy and took one alive. The prisoner and 20 pairs of ears were brought back to the presidio, where the prisoner was executed by gunshot on the 25th. Think about how that Indian felt next time you're not enjoying your drive to San Diego. Pagan and neophyte Indians then joined presidio leatherjacket soldiers in a second battle in San Felipe Valley• One of his Indian recruits was killed, and 14 others were injured. One soldier was injured• The soldiers had 7-ply quilted buckskin jackets which provided light but effective A lTfh.centuj draWine itr's err ;,, +. , .  shozoine t,.. _ protection against arrows• Eighteen pairs of ears were brought back. A metal helmet or armor would have been too cumbersome and hot. A drawing from Seville's Archivo de Indias next to the huge cathedral shows a leatherjacket cavalryman outfitted with lance, "carabina" [smoothbore musket], pistols, a shield, spurred boots The Julian News 11 in wooden stirrups, and a "cartuchera" for ammunition. A commission reported the presidio buildings then to be in a "deplorable ruinous condition," as was the fort guarding the harbor at Ballast Point by the bay. The new Mexican government had not been very forthcoming with funding for public works, and soldiers' payrolls were often in arrears. Stress-Free Ways To Help Your Child's School (NAPS)--Volunteering at your child's school does not have to be overwhelming--if you don't overschedule yourself and you take easy steps to get organized. Parental involvement builds great schools and has been shown to benefit children• According to recent research cited by the Parent Teacher Association, parental engagement in a child's education increases student achievement, improves attendance and reduces the dropout rate. Here are five easy ways to pitch in--without overdoing it: 1. Volunteer to do something that fits into your schedule• For example, parents who work--or those with young kids-- might choose to help once a term by chaperoning a field trip or helping with a field day or a holiday performance• Parents with more flexible schedules are needed as classroom assistants and cafeteria and library helpers• 2. Share your talents• Do you have expertise in art, music, woodworking, computers, gardening, etc? Many of these "extras" are the first things to go in a budget crisis, and community members can bridge gaps and help inspire kids' creativity. continued on page 12 NOTARY PUBLIC Becky Gambrill\\; me:760-765-27601 e.: 760-533-4429 t Please call / for an air,ointment On line TAx s00.v,c00 Tax Audit Representation • Return Preparation QuickBooks Training & Setup Incorporation Services ° Business Planning 619-445-5523 ph • 619-445-1421 fax New cfients only www.olbts.com PUBLIC NOTICE ') US Army Corps Request for information about the former of Engineers® Borre._qo Springs. Clark's Dry Lake Recently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed a Site Inspection at the former Borrego Springs. Clark's Dry Lake. This site was used as an emergency landing field for horizontal, glide and dive bombing (using practice bombs) from 1942 through 1947. The former Borrego Springs- Clark's Dry Lake is one of many former military installations throughout the United States that will be reviewed under the Department of Defense's Munitions Response Site Prioritization Protocol. This protocol is used to assess sites that may have unexploded ordnance, discarded military munitions or munitions constituents, and to assign priorities for any additional investigation or munitions removal that may be required. The evaluation criteria, including types of munitions that may be present, ease of access to the site, and number of people living near the site are available for public review in the Site Inspection Report. A copy of the document is located at the Borrego Springs Branch Library, 587 Palm Canyon Drive Suite 125, Borrego Springs, CA 92004. The draft final version of this document is also available on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Los Angeles District Website at http:// www.spl.usace.army.mil/fuds.html. For more information or if you have additional information about past activities related to the former Borrego Springs. Clark's Dry Lake, please contact: Lloyd Godard Project Manager (213) 452-4014 or (213) USACE, Los Angeles District ATTN: CESPL-PM-M !915 Wilshire Blvd. I ;Los Angeles, CA 90017-3401 IIoyd.e.godard@usace.army.mil For media queries: Jennie Ayala Public Affairs Specialist 452-3925 or (213) 479-8634 USACE, Los Angeles District ATTN: CESPL-PA 915 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1146 Los Angeles, CA 90017 jennie.ayala@usace.army.mil Published July 27 and August 3, 2011 Julian News 05668 i , t