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November 19, 2014     The Julian News
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10 The Julian News Lovely home over-looking Lake Cuyamaca. This custom home skillfully combines clean modern lines with rustic treatments of wood, copper, sheet metal and bamboo. The floor to ceiling windows on the South and East sides provide natural light, spectacular views and an impressive passive heat source in the winter. Rare, oversized .58 acre lot, 2+ bedrooms, 2 baths, and an atrium style family room. Offered at $367,900. Best Deal on the Mountain Exquisite, architect designed custom home with one of the finest panoramic views in all of Julian featured from every room. 3,300 sq.ft.,includes gourmet kitchen, 3 romantic fireplaces, private guest wing. 2.5 acres, spacious garage and workshop. Offered below replacement cost. Reduced to $699,000 $184,000 Townsite: .65 acres, water in, septic layout $129,000 Townsite View: .99 acres $145,000 IN ESCROW - Harrison Park: 9.92 acres, well, elec. reduced $130,000 Pine Hills: 8.21 acres, view $160,000 SOLD - Pine Hills: 4.2 acres, well, septic in, view! $175,000 Pine Hills: 6.32 acres, $175,000 Historic District 3.97 acres, with well, cleared and park like with incredible views! $125,000. Genuine Historic Julian Home. This home built in 1899 is charming and unique. Perfect for someone who wants to b( active in preserving Julian's rich heritage. 3 bedrooms/3 full baths, 2 car garage, studio guest house with full bath. Has been used as a weekend rental for many years. Located in the heart of Julian. $42s, ooo Cute and Clean. 2 bedroom plus an office, 2 bath, large lot, deck, Great views of the Julian countryside. Excellent buy at $250,000 Custom Home with terrific views on 8.41 acres. 2 - 2 car garages, Two story. Well on Property, Large brick courtyard. Short Sale - $450,000 View Parcel, 5 acres.. Nice gently slopping parcel, good well, water storage tank, shed and pump house. There is a septic tank installed but the condition of the system is unknown at this time. A very good buy at $123,000 Panoramic View Lot in Pine Hills. Surveyed &Perc Test Completed. Proposed Septic Layout. Electric Nearby. $16o, ooo Usable 2.2 acre parcel with well, view and electricity. Price to sell at $109,000 Beautiful 10 acre Lot with incredible northwesterly views. Pad, well, tank, roads in, private. Must see to appreciate! $1s4,ooo The follies which a man regrets most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. -- Helen Rowland. CReal Estat i Matthew Pitman, broker, SRES 760-212-8661 www andiegochoicere.com - broker@sdchoicere.com 1459 Hollow Glen Rd - CABR Z7217S0 "Have A Hike ... Dine with a Turkey" by Bill Fink A Letter Home In the late thirties and forties America was changing fast. Europe was already at war and after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 America was about to change even faster. As men and teenage boy in the cities lined up around the blocks and stood in line all night to get into the recruiters office, the same phenomena was taking place in small towns in rural America, the coal mining areas in the south and across the continental divide and into the west. In many ways America was still a small and provincial country back then. Regional accents and customs were distinct. Long distance travel by train or plane wasn't common then. My Dad, growing up in those days in Brooklyn, NY recalls that milk, and ice were delivered by horse and wagon. No Internet or computers. Telephones, if you had one, worked only through an operator and TV hadn't even been invented yet. Technology was the radio, with the Green Lantern, Buck Rogers, Burns and Allen, the Dodgers, Yankees and Giants in New York. President Roosevelt's fireside chats broadcast nation-wide, kept America informed and morale up during the Depression. In those days, Dad was as likely to know a farm boy from Mississippi, or miner's son from West Virginia or Kentucky as he would the man in the moon. He knew where California and Hawaii were from maps, but never had met anyone from there. Being from New York, he probably would have thought that Californians had odd accents... dude. So in those days, America was small. Vast in area but small in the sphere in which you lived. When war broke out and enlistees and draftees from all over the country were thrown together in "basic" (basic training) the culture shock was eye opening. Not only was the shock of discipline, grueling physical training and learning the art of war new to our young men, but so too the accents, different traditions and heritage of all the American cultures. One thing that my Dad told me was the extreme difference between him and some of his new barracks mates, the farm boys from the South. He always seemed in agony telling me about the misery of reveille at 5 a.m. and dragging himself out of the rack to ready for inspection and calisthenics. The farm boys of course were already up, dressed and having a smoke outside while the city fellers were moaning about the early hour. A lot has changed about the military since those days, while a lot has not. What follows is a recent letter home from a young southern Marine in "boot camp", not called "basic" anymore. For those of you who have never served, read carefully. For those of you who "have" served does it sound familiar? And is the irony lost on anyone but me? IOWA FARM KID JOINS THE MARINES Dear Ma and Pa, I am well. Hope you are. Tell Brother Walt and Brother Elmer the Marine Corps beats working for old man Minch by a mile. Tell them to join up quick before all of the places are filled. I was restless at first because you get to stay in bed till nearly 6 a.m. But I am getting so I like to sleep late. Tell Walt and Elmer all you do before breakfast is smooth your cot, and shine some things. No hogs to slop, feed to pitch, mash to mix, wood to split, fire to lay. Practically nothing. Men got to shave but it is not so bad, there's warm water. Breakfast is strong on trimmings like fruit juice, cereal, eggs, bacon, etc., but kind of weak on chops, potatoes, ham, steak, fried eggplant, pie and other regular food, but tell Walt and Elmer you can always sit by the two city boys who live on coffee. Their food, plus yours, holds you until noon when you get fed again. It's no wonder these city boys can't walk much. We go on 'route marches,' which the platoon sergeant says are long walks to harden us. If he thinks so, it's not my place to" tell him different. A 'route march' is about as far as to our mailbox at home. Then the city guys get sore feet and we all ride back in trucks. The sergeant is like a schoolteacher. He nags a lot. The Captain is like the school board. Majors and colonels just ride around and frown. They don't bother you none. This next will kill Walt and Elmer with laughing. I keep getting medals for shooting. I don't know why. The bulls-eye is near as big as a chipmunk head and don't move, and it ain't shooting at you like the Higgett boys at home. All you got to do is lie there all comfortable and hit it. You don't even load your own cartridges. They come in boxes. Then we have what they call hand-to-hand combat training. You get to wrestle with them city boys. I have to be real careful though, they break real easy. It ain't like fighting with that ole bull at home. I'm about the best they got in this except for that Tug Jordan from over in Silver Lake. I only beat him once. He joined up the same time as me, but I'm only 5'6' and 130 pounds and he's 6'8' and near 300 pounds dry. Be sure to tell Walt and Elmer to hurry and join before other fellers get onto this setup and come stampeding in. Your loving daughter, Alice This is certainly a big change. Is it progress? Hear Ye! Hear Ye! "Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything." -- George Bernard Shaw "Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator. And change has its enemies." Robert Kennedy "I'm not going to change the way I look or the way I feel to conform to anything... I'm one of those people." John Lennon Ask Pastor Rick Religion In The News Religion in the NewsAsk Pastor Rick has reached a milestone: 150 articles. I offer my thanks for your readership. Also for the remarks I've received via eMail and in person about them--both positive and negative/ Leading Mega-Church To Dissolve The Mars Hill organization will soon cease to exist, as church leaders have decided to "dissolve" the multi-site organization and allow its churches to become independent. Christianity Today reports that the transition will be completed by New Year's Day. Dave Bruskas, the primary teaching pastor at Mars Hill announced on November 2nd, "Rather than remaining a centralized multi-site church with video-led teaching distributed to multiple locations, the best future for each of our existing local churches is for them to become autonomous self-governed entities. This means that each of our locations has an opportunity November 19, 2014 to become a new church, rooted in the best of what Mars Hill has been in the past, and independently led and run by its own local elder teams." The Mars Hill organization was founded in 1996. The decision to dissolve the name and Mars Hill organization came after former senior pastor Mark Driscoll resigned from his position. Source: Christianity Today, summarized by Pastor Rick Ask Pastor Rick What does it mean to be sealed by the Holy Spirit? In ancient days when something had a "seal" placed upon it, it signified four primary things: security, authenticity, ownership, and authority. Let me just address one of those things, security. When Daniel was placed into the lion's den, King Darius put a seal on the stone over the entrance to the den, "so that nothing might be changed in regard to Daniel" [see Daniel 6:17]. Any person but the king who disturbed that seal would likely have been put to death. In a similar way the tomb of Jesus was sealed. Fearing that Jesus' disciples might steal His body and falsely claim His resurrection, the Jewish leaders obtained Pilate's permission to place a seal on the stone and to guard it with soldiers [see Matthew 27:62-66]. In an infinitely greater way, the Holy Spirit seals/secures every Christ follower, marking him or her with His own inviolable seal. Rick Hill is the Senior Pastor at Hillside Church on 3rd and C Streets in Julian, CA. Direct all questions and correspondence to: PastorRick@ julianchurch.org or Hillside Church, Religion In The News, Box 973, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.) PETS OF THE WEEK It's Flu Season- Here's How To Avoid The Bug (NAPSA)-While flu season in the U.S. historically starts in October, most of us don't think about it until either we get sick or a family member or co-worker does, and by then, it may be too late. One of the few facts about flu season is that it's always unpredictable and may peak at any time in the fall, winter or even spring months. That's why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people get the flu shot each year as soon as vaccine is available. Many Americans do just that- however, as a society it seems we've become more reactive when it comes to flu season, and data supports it. A notable behavioral shift over the past few years has seen a considerable percentage of the population waiting to get their flu shots until flu activity becomes widespread. And that may not be the wisest choice. "It takes up to two weeks for the body to build full immunity following a flu shot, and you're significantly increasing your chances of getting sick if you wait until the last minute when flu is already circulating in your community," said Harry Leider, M.D., Walgreens chief medical officer. "Sometimes, people can get complacent after a couple of mild flu seasons, but the past two years we've seen how far- reaching the impact of a severe season can be, and why it's so important to get a flu shot early as continued on page 14 Toby is a 2 year old neutered Chihuahua who weighs 121bs. Toby adores being the center of attention and will crawl into your lap for endless snuggling. Affectionate and friendly with people, he will have no problem adjusting to a new home. Toby is good with other dogs and loves to play. Meet this happy guy by asking for ID#A1602305 Tag#C782. Toby can be adopted for $69. Steffie is a 1 year old spayed Tortie who weighs 7.61bs. Friendly and outgoing, she hops right out of her cage when you open the door. Steffie is affectionate and enjoys being petted and having her head scratched. She gets along with other cats and is currently housed with a second feline for companionship. Meet this sweet girl by asking for ID#A1597051 Tag#C993. Steffie can be adopted for $58. All adoption fees include vaccinations, spaying/neutering (upon adoption), a microchip and free Vet visit. Dog fees also include a 1 year license. Dennis and Antonia are at our Central County Shelter, 5480 Gaines Street, San Diego. The Shelter hours are 9:30AM to 5:30PM, Tuesday through Saturday or visit www.sddac.com for more information. 10 The Julian News Lovely home over-looking Lake Cuyamaca. This custom home skillfully combines clean modern lines with rustic treatments of wood, copper, sheet metal and bamboo. The floor to ceiling windows on the South and East sides provide natural light, spectacular views and an impressive passive heat source in the winter. Rare, oversized .58 acre lot, 2+ bedrooms, 2 baths, and an atrium style family room. Offered at $367,900. Best Deal on the Mountain Exquisite, architect designed custom home with one of the finest panoramic views in all of Julian featured from every room. 3,300 sq.ft.,includes gourmet kitchen, 3 romantic fireplaces, private guest wing. 2.5 acres, spacious garage and workshop. Offered below replacement cost. Reduced to $699,000 $184,000 Townsite: .65 acres, water in, septic layout $129,000 Townsite View: .99 acres $145,000 IN ESCROW - Harrison Park: 9.92 acres, well, elec. reduced $130,000 Pine Hills: 8.21 acres, view $160,000 SOLD - Pine Hills: 4.2 acres, well, septic in, view! $175,000 Pine Hills: 6.32 acres, $175,000 Historic District 3.97 acres, with well, cleared and park like with incredible views! $125,000. Genuine Historic Julian Home. This home built in 1899 is charming and unique. Perfect for someone who wants to b( active in preserving Julian's rich heritage. 3 bedrooms/3 full baths, 2 car garage, studio guest house with full bath. Has been used as a weekend rental for many years. Located in the heart of Julian. $42s, ooo Cute and Clean. 2 bedroom plus an office, 2 bath, large lot, deck, Great views of the Julian countryside. Excellent buy at $250,000 Custom Home with terrific views on 8.41 acres. 2 - 2 car garages, Two story. Well on Property, Large brick courtyard. Short Sale - $450,000 View Parcel, 5 acres.. Nice gently slopping parcel, good well, water storage tank, shed and pump house. There is a septic tank installed but the condition of the system is unknown at this time. A very good buy at $123,000 Panoramic View Lot in Pine Hills. Surveyed &Perc Test Completed. Proposed Septic Layout. Electric Nearby. $16o, ooo Usable 2.2 acre parcel with well, view and electricity. Price to sell at $109,000 Beautiful 10 acre Lot with incredible northwesterly views. Pad, well, tank, roads in, private. Must see to appreciate! $1s4,ooo The follies which a man regrets most in his life are those which he didn't commit when he had the opportunity. -- Helen Rowland. CReal Estat i Matthew Pitman, broker, SRES 760-212-8661 www andiegochoicere.com - broker@sdchoicere.com 1459 Hollow Glen Rd - CABR Z7217S0 "Have A Hike ... Dine with a Turkey" by Bill Fink A Letter Home In the late thirties and forties America was changing fast. Europe was already at war and after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 America was about to change even faster. As men and teenage boy in the cities lined up around the blocks and stood in line all night to get into the recruiters office, the same phenomena was taking place in small towns in rural America, the coal mining areas in the south and across the continental divide and into the west. In many ways America was still a small and provincial country back then. Regional accents and customs were distinct. Long distance travel by train or plane wasn't common then. My Dad, growing up in those days in Brooklyn, NY recalls that milk, and ice were delivered by horse and wagon. No Internet or computers. Telephones, if you had one, worked only through an operator and TV hadn't even been invented yet. Technology was the radio, with the Green Lantern, Buck Rogers, Burns and Allen, the Dodgers, Yankees and Giants in New York. President Roosevelt's fireside chats broadcast nation-wide, kept America informed and morale up during the Depression. In those days, Dad was as likely to know a farm boy from Mississippi, or miner's son from West Virginia or Kentucky as he would the man in the moon. He knew where California and Hawaii were from maps, but never had met anyone from there. Being from New York, he probably would have thought that Californians had odd accents... dude. So in those days, America was small. Vast in area but small in the sphere in which you lived. When war broke out and enlistees and draftees from all over the country were thrown together in "basic" (basic training) the culture shock was eye opening. Not only was the shock of discipline, grueling physical training and learning the art of war new to our young men, but so too the accents, different traditions and heritage of all the American cultures. One thing that my Dad told me was the extreme difference between him and some of his new barracks mates, the farm boys from the South. He always seemed in agony telling me about the misery of reveille at 5 a.m. and dragging himself out of the rack to ready for inspection and calisthenics. The farm boys of course were already up, dressed and having a smoke outside while the city fellers were moaning about the early hour. A lot has changed about the military since those days, while a lot has not. What follows is a recent letter home from a young southern Marine in "boot camp", not called "basic" anymore. For those of you who have never served, read carefully. For those of you who "have" served does it sound familiar? And is the irony lost on anyone but me? IOWA FARM KID JOINS THE MARINES Dear Ma and Pa, I am well. Hope you are. Tell Brother Walt and Brother Elmer the Marine Corps beats working for old man Minch by a mile. Tell them to join up quick before all of the places are filled. I was restless at first because you get to stay in bed till nearly 6 a.m. But I am getting so I like to sleep late. Tell Walt and Elmer all you do before breakfast is smooth your cot, and shine some things. No hogs to slop, feed to pitch, mash to mix, wood to split, fire to lay. Practically nothing. Men got to shave but it is not so bad, there's warm water. Breakfast is strong on trimmings like fruit juice, cereal, eggs, bacon, etc., but kind of weak on chops, potatoes, ham, steak, fried eggplant, pie and other regular food, but tell Walt and Elmer you can always sit by the two city boys who live on coffee. Their food, plus yours, holds you until noon when you get fed again. It's no wonder these city boys can't walk much. We go on 'route marches,' which the platoon sergeant says are long walks to harden us. If he thinks so, it's not my place to" tell him different. A 'route march' is about as far as to our mailbox at home. Then the city guys get sore feet and we all ride back in trucks. The sergeant is like a schoolteacher. He nags a lot. The Captain is like the school board. Majors and colonels just ride around and frown. They don't bother you none. This next will kill Walt and Elmer with laughing. I keep getting medals for shooting. I don't know why. The bulls-eye is near as big as a chipmunk head and don't move, and it ain't shooting at you like the Higgett boys at home. All you got to do is lie there all comfortable and hit it. You don't even load your own cartridges. They come in boxes. Then we have what they call hand-to-hand combat training. You get to wrestle with them city boys. I have to be real careful though, they break real easy. It ain't like fighting with that ole bull at home. I'm about the best they got in this except for that Tug Jordan from over in Silver Lake. I only beat him once. He joined up the same time as me, but I'm only 5'6' and 130 pounds and he's 6'8' and near 300 pounds dry. Be sure to tell Walt and Elmer to hurry and join before other fellers get onto this setup and come stampeding in. Your loving daughter, Alice This is certainly a big change. Is it progress? Hear Ye! Hear Ye! "Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change anything." -- George Bernard Shaw "Progress is a nice word. But change is its motivator. And change has its enemies." Robert Kennedy "I'm not going to change the way I look or the way I feel to conform to anything... I'm one of those people." John Lennon Ask Pastor Rick Religion In The News Religion in the NewsAsk Pastor Rick has reached a milestone: 150 articles. I offer my thanks for your readership. Also for the remarks I've received via eMail and in person about them--both positive and negative/ Leading Mega-Church To Dissolve The Mars Hill organization will soon cease to exist, as church leaders have decided to "dissolve" the multi-site organization and allow its churches to become independent. Christianity Today reports that the transition will be completed by New Year's Day. Dave Bruskas, the primary teaching pastor at Mars Hill announced on November 2nd, "Rather than remaining a centralized multi-site church with video-led teaching distributed to multiple locations, the best future for each of our existing local churches is for them to become autonomous self-governed entities. This means that each of our locations has an opportunity November 19, 2014 to become a new church, rooted in the best of what Mars Hill has been in the past, and independently led and run by its own local elder teams." The Mars Hill organization was founded in 1996. The decision to dissolve the name and Mars Hill organization came after former senior pastor Mark Driscoll resigned from his position. Source: Christianity Today, summarized by Pastor Rick Ask Pastor Rick What does it mean to be sealed by the Holy Spirit? In ancient days when something had a "seal" placed upon it, it signified four primary things: security, authenticity, ownership, and authority. Let me just address one of those things, security. When Daniel was placed into the lion's den, King Darius put a seal on the stone over the entrance to the den, "so that nothing might be changed in regard to Daniel" [see Daniel 6:17]. Any person but the king who disturbed that seal would likely have been put to death. In a similar way the tomb of Jesus was sealed. Fearing that Jesus' disciples might steal His body and falsely claim His resurrection, the Jewish leaders obtained Pilate's permission to place a seal on the stone and to guard it with soldiers [see Matthew 27:62-66]. In an infinitely greater way, the Holy Spirit seals/secures every Christ follower, marking him or her with His own inviolable seal. Rick Hill is the Senior Pastor at Hillside Church on 3rd and C Streets in Julian, CA. Direct all questions and correspondence to: PastorRick@ julianchurch.org or Hillside Church, Religion In The News, Box 973, Julian, CA, 92036. (Opinions in this column do not necessarily express the views of Julian News, its editor, or employees.) PETS OF THE WEEK It's Flu Season- Here's How To Avoid The Bug (NAPSA)-While flu season in the U.S. historically starts in October, most of us don't think about it until either we get sick or a family member or co-worker does, and by then, it may be too late. One of the few facts about flu season is that it's always unpredictable and may peak at any time in the fall, winter or even spring months. That's why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that people get the flu shot each year as soon as vaccine is available. Many Americans do just that- however, as a society it seems we've become more reactive when it comes to flu season, and data supports it. A notable behavioral shift over the past few years has seen a considerable percentage of the population waiting to get their flu shots until flu activity becomes widespread. And that may not be the wisest choice. "It takes up to two weeks for the body to build full immunity following a flu shot, and you're significantly increasing your chances of getting sick if you wait until the last minute when flu is already circulating in your community," said Harry Leider, M.D., Walgreens chief medical officer. "Sometimes, people can get complacent after a couple of mild flu seasons, but the past two years we've seen how far- reaching the impact of a severe season can be, and why it's so important to get a flu shot early as continued on page 14 Toby is a 2 year old neutered Chihuahua who weighs 121bs. Toby adores being the center of attention and will crawl into your lap for endless snuggling. Affectionate and friendly with people, he will have no problem adjusting to a new home. Toby is good with other dogs and loves to play. Meet this happy guy by asking for ID#A1602305 Tag#C782. Toby can be adopted for $69. Steffie is a 1 year old spayed Tortie who weighs 7.61bs. Friendly and outgoing, she hops right out of her cage when you open the door. Steffie is affectionate and enjoys being petted and having her head scratched. She gets along with other cats and is currently housed with a second feline for companionship. Meet this sweet girl by asking for ID#A1597051 Tag#C993. Steffie can be adopted for $58. All adoption fees include vaccinations, spaying/neutering (upon adoption), a microchip and free Vet visit. Dog fees also include a 1 year license. Dennis and Antonia are at our Central County Shelter, 5480 Gaines Street, San Diego. The Shelter hours are 9:30AM to 5:30PM, Tuesday through Saturday or visit www.sddac.com for more information.